Faye Alison Gilbert
A Wedding, Me, and the Family Tree by Faye Alison Gilbert

Six-year-old Dana, a little Jewish girl with a big personality, is about
to attend a family wedding.  At the synagogue, she’ll discover the
“ritzy-ditzy” party room, talk to Moses, attempt to sing with the band,
and try to understand why her mom is taking pictures of relatives to
hang on a tree!
Children are my favorite people. That's why I like to write for them...about
them...and sometimes even with them. When I work on a story or poem, I eat
lots of chocolate for inspiration. (Only kidding. I just like chocolate.) Now in my
13th year at a Milwaukee, Wisconsin public elementary school, I continue to
remain a literacy tutor to a great bunch of culturally diverse kids. In addition, I
relentlessly research my ancestry and savor time with my family. My first
book, "A Wedding, Me, and the Family Tree," was released October 2011
followed by "Mushy Red Stuff" in November 2012 and "Sweet and Sour Power
(The Witches of Danarobbeth)" in November 2013.
"This precious picture book features a 6-year-old Jewish girl who has a problem thinking too literally. She wants to call the police
because some guy stole her aunt's heart and yet her aunt still wants to marry him. At the wedding in the synagogue, she discovers a
stained glass window of Moses at the burning bush, yet he doesn't have a stain anywhere on him. Days later, she and her mother look at
wedding pictures, then she rushes outside to find their family tree her mother keeps talking about. This is a delightful book that reminds
me of Amelia Bedelia. The author does a good job of using literal thinking as a means to explain to children how words don't always
mean what they say and how funny that can be.."  
...............................................................................................................................................................................................- Hartland Reviews
“A Wedding, Me, and the Family Tree” is a short story for young readers following curious Dana as she explores a wedding at the
synagogue.  With plenty to learn for young readers about tradition, “A Wedding, Me, and the Family Tree” is an excellent pick for any Judaic
children’s picture book collection.  
...............................................................................................................................................................................................- Midwest Book Review
Mushy Red Stuff by Faye Alison Gilbert

It’s Passover and Eli is stuck going to Grandma and Grandpa’s boring
Seder again. Just listening to his annoying little brother practice the four
questions is torture enough! Eli would rather be anywhere else but this
time he’s in for an unexpected surprise. A bowl of mushy red stuff will
turn the evening into something extraordinary and Passover, for Eli, will
never be the same again.
"Cute picture book. . .many Jewish customs are portrayed. .
.demonstrates how young people interact with adults, especially
grandparents. . .story easily connects with children.  The grandfather
is quite humorous.  Excellent diversity."                     Hartland Reviews
"Mushy Red Stuff" is an exciting Seder story for kids.  Even a
surprising kiss from Eli’s grandpa is a memorable experience, along
with a promise from him to share his secret recipe for the "mushy
red stuff."  The humor and action and the youthful outlook of its
protagonist make "Mushy Red Stuff" a keeper for young readers.
Cultural diversity is made so much easier when readers enjoy
identifying with a spunky boy like Eli.
...–Midwest Book Review
Sweet and Sour Power (The Witches of
Danarobbeth)
by Faye Alison Gilbert

The land of Danarobbeth is a peaceful, quiet place
but it wasn’t always so. Long ago, the SWEETS and
SOURS, some very unneighborly witches, started
fussing and fighting over the local flowers and weeds.
Little did they know they were about to set a legend in
motion.
“Clever, colorfully illustrated fantasy. . .twists and turns. . .
elements of magic. . . enchanting. . .creative, effective
literature.”--- Midwest Book Review
Fiddle Dee Dee by Faye Alison Gilbert

Robbie loves to play his violin but he is driving his
parents crazy. He's too busy practicing to say anything
but "fiddle dee dee" and they have no idea what it
means. With help from Robbie’s music teacher, they
finally understand but Robbie is about to have
something else to say.
Exceptional.  
-Council for Wisconsin Writers


Precocious eight-year-old has a laser-like focus for
practicing the violin he loves. . .lively. . . colorful
illustrations. . .wonder. . .whimsy. . . warmhearted story.  
-Midwest Review
Redheaded Ed by Faye Alison Gilbert
Ed’s adored by all the girls who love his hair of bright red curls
but once they’ve grown, they leave the town.
(Not one decides to stick around.)
Ed soon meets a girl with flair who tells him she admires his hair.
Does she really like the red he grows upon his hairy head?
Amazon.com     B & N.com